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Kochi, a land with abundant nature and a rich climate
full of exciting historical and gourmet food destinations

Kochi Prefecture is located in the southern part of Japan’s Shikoku Island. Shaped like an elongated fan, Kochi is bordered by the Pacific Ocean to the south and Tokushima and Ehime prefectures to the north across the Shikoku Mountains. In addition to its vast mountain ranges, 84% of the prefecture is covered by forest, the highest percentage in Japan. Kochi is home to the Shimanto River, the longest river in Shikoku at 196 km, and the Niyodo River, renowned for its superior water quality. Recognized as two of Japan’s finest, these rivers provide the area with plentiful clean water.

Kochi Prefecture is also known for the majestic scenery of its rich natural environment. Katsurahama Beach is one of the most famous sightseeing destinations in Kochi. Known since ancient times as a location for moonwatching, Katsurahama Beach offers white sand and green pine trees in addition to a popular bronze statue of Sakamoto Ryoma—a famous samurai from the waning days of the Tokugawa Shogunate—looking out over the Pacific Ocean. Kochi also offers visitors the chance to experience the mystery of nature at Shikoku Karst Natural Park in the Shikoku Karst area, one of Japan’s three most prominent karst regions, and Ryuga Cave, one of Japan’s most famous limestone caves. Located at the southernmost tip of Shikoku, Cape Ashizuri sits at the very tip of the Ashizuri Peninsula reaching out into the Pacific Ocean. Visitors to this popular sightseeing destination can find dynamic panoramas where they can actually see the curvature of the Earth.

Shikoku is famous for the Shikoku 88 Temple Pilgrimage, a pilgrimage route that includes 88 different temples. The 24th to 39th temples on this route are scattered throughout Kochi Prefecture. The vast distances between many of the temples have given the area the reputation as a “training dojo.” The prefecture has numerous other historical sites, such as Kochi Castle, erected by Yamauchi Kazutoyo, the first feudal lord of Tosa Domain, and several birthplaces and memorial halls of Tosa warriors born toward the end of the Tokugawa Shogunate.

Kochi’s Hirome Market is a must-visit location for gourmet food. Here, visitors will find various delicacies from around the prefecture. The large facility with many stalls includes some 40 restaurants, souvenir shops, and general goods stores. Instead of dining in at the restaurants, visitors generally buy what they want and eat it in the dedicated communal dining area. Hirome Market is often crowded throughout the day with both tourists and locals, who come to enjoy Kochi’s famous seafood and other delicacies—from bonito and whale meat to delicious sake.
Read more Hide Kochi Prefecture is located in the southern part of Japan’s Shikoku Island. Shaped like an elongated fan, Kochi is bordered by the Pacific Ocean to the south and Tokushima and Ehime prefectures to the north across the Shikoku Mountains. In addition to its vast mountain ranges, 84% of the prefecture is covered by forest, the highest percentage in Japan. Kochi is home to the Shimanto River, the longest river in Shikoku at 196 km, and the Niyodo River, renowned for its superior water quality. Recognized as two of Japan’s finest, these rivers provide the area with plentiful clean water.

Kochi Prefecture is also known for the majestic scenery of its rich natural environment. Katsurahama Beach is one of the most famous sightseeing destinations in Kochi. Known since ancient times as a location for moonwatching, Katsurahama Beach offers white sand and green pine trees in addition to a popular bronze statue of Sakamoto Ryoma—a famous samurai from the waning days of the Tokugawa Shogunate—looking out over the Pacific Ocean. Kochi also offers visitors the chance to experience the mystery of nature at Shikoku Karst Natural Park in the Shikoku Karst area, one of Japan’s three most prominent karst regions, and Ryuga Cave, one of Japan’s most famous limestone caves. Located at the southernmost tip of Shikoku, Cape Ashizuri sits at the very tip of the Ashizuri Peninsula reaching out into the Pacific Ocean. Visitors to this popular sightseeing destination can find dynamic panoramas where they can actually see the curvature of the Earth.

Shikoku is famous for the Shikoku 88 Temple Pilgrimage, a pilgrimage route that includes 88 different temples. The 24th to 39th temples on this route are scattered throughout Kochi Prefecture. The vast distances between many of the temples have given the area the reputation as a “training dojo.” The prefecture has numerous other historical sites, such as Kochi Castle, erected by Yamauchi Kazutoyo, the first feudal lord of Tosa Domain, and several birthplaces and memorial halls of Tosa warriors born toward the end of the Tokugawa Shogunate.

Kochi’s Hirome Market is a must-visit location for gourmet food. Here, visitors will find various delicacies from around the prefecture. The large facility with many stalls includes some 40 restaurants, souvenir shops, and general goods stores. Instead of dining in at the restaurants, visitors generally buy what they want and eat it in the dedicated communal dining area. Hirome Market is often crowded throughout the day with both tourists and locals, who come to enjoy Kochi’s famous seafood and other delicacies—from bonito and whale meat to delicious sake.

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